Tag

body language

Browsing

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

__________

In this second part I would like to continue talking about non-verbal communication and its characteristics, this time focusing on training, sensory perception, personal look and colour, while explaining the importance of identifying assonances and dissonances between verbal and non-verbal language.

Training

Training on the use of paralinguistic elements means learning the strategic use of pauses and tones. It includes many repertoires of theatrical and actor techniques, such as the Stanislavskij method, probably the only one truly capable of transforming expressive behaviours.

Without adequate preparation the chances of being competitive on the negotiating level decrease. As the gap between our training level and the training level of the counterpart increases, the risk of an unfavourable outcome during a negotiation grows.

Sensory Perceptions

Some clichés spreading in multicultural college campuses are that whites “taste like chicken”, Asians “smell of garlic”, blacks “taste of sweat”, etc.

The olfactory differences on an ethnic and genetic level do exist, but the perceived smell is largely determined by cultural factors such as nutrition, cleanliness or the use of perfumes.

Personal olfactory emissions are a communication tool.

It is certain that the sense of smell affects perception, and that food produces essences that exude from the skin and breath. If we want to manage even the smallest details of intercultural negotiation and, more generally, of the human contact, we must take care of these aspects.

Anything that can be attributed to the subject or to the corporate environment affects perception and image. Some clothing chains have resorted to the targeted deodorization of shops to create a more relaxed and pleasant atmosphere (environmental olfactory marketing).

Smell is a remote sense of the human being, partially abandoned in favour of senses such as sight and hearing. Animal “noses” are able to pick up smells that signal sexual emotions or predispositions, while human noses seem to have lost this trait.

There are practical implications for conscious personal deodorization: avoid foods that can produce strong breath emissions, avoid excessive personal fragrances, be aware of personal odours (e.g. sweat) and consider the importance of olfactory environmental marketing.

Personal Look

We usually know nothing about people’s real history. We can only assume it by looking at the symbols they decide to show us. There are signs/symbols everywhere: on the interlocutor and in his/her communicative space. Symbolic communication concerns the meanings that people associate to and perceive from those particular “signs”. By communicative space we mean any area linked to the subject’s “system”, such as his/her car, or the background of his/her computer, and any other sign from which we derive information, meanings and interpretations.

From a semiotic point of view, every element from which a subject draws meaning becomes a “sign”, whether the bearer is aware of it or not.

Look, clothing and accessories are among the most incisive factors that build one’s personal image.

Differences or similarities in clothing, for example, can put a person inside a professional ingroup (“one like us”, an “equal”) or an outgroup (“one different from us”), depending of the meaning that the word “us” has for the interlocutor.

In a widened signification system, the symbols associated to the brands used, the type of car, and even the office furniture, can become very important.

chronemic behaviours (the string of actions over time) are also broadened signals related to how frequently we change clothes, punctuality, way of driving (calm or nervous), way of eating (slow and relaxed vs. fast and voracious), etc.

Even considering the time a person takes in answering a question can be significant: slow or overly thoughtful responses can be interpreted as insincere in Western cultures or wise in Eastern cultures.

It can be said that in the field of intercultural communication nothing escapes the observation of the interlocutor, and every “sign” contributes to its classification and evaluation.

Colours

An additional element of symbolic communication is colour. The use of colours and the symbolisms associated with colours also vary according to cultures.

It is not possible to list all possible associations for every colour in each country, but I would like to underline the importance of paying attention to the symbolisms associated with colours, because there are many problems that could arise when choosing colours and graphics, for example in packaging, in business gifts and in objects.

Even objects and symbols are not neutral: an Italian company, for example, used the symbol of an open hand to create the company logo and key rings, producing a wave of protests in Greece, where the open hand symbol is used to offend.

The basic principle to avoid macroscopic errors is the use of pre-tests: a “pilot test” on some member of the local culture, who are able to give a feedback on the appropriateness of colours, shapes and symbolisms within their cultural context.

The pre-test method also applies to the choice of gifts, presents, and any other symbolic action whose impact may vary on a cultural basis.

Consonances and Dissonances between Verbal and Non-Verbal Language

Non-verbal communication can reinforce the verbal message or be dissonant with it.

Listening carefully and nodding can express interest more than just a verbal statement. Saying “I’m interested” with words and expressing boredom or disgust with body actions produces a dissonant signal and creates suspicion or irritation.

The coherence (matching) between words and actions:

  • increases the subject’s perceived honesty;
  • denotes trustworthiness;
  • shows interest;
  • shows that we are in control of the situation;
  • produces a sense of security and solidity of content.

On the contrary, the incongruity:

  • creates a sense of mistrust;
  • generates a feeling of lack of authenticity;
  • produces doubts and suspicions, because the heard verbal content is considered false.

Each linguistic style (on an interpersonal level) is associated with a precise modulation of the non-verbal style. We can indeed have:

  • situations of communicative reinforcement (the non-verbal style reinforces the verbal style);
  • situations of dissonance or inconsistency between verbal and non-verbal communication: the non-verbal language is on a different register than the verbal one.

The dissonances concern every semiotic system, every sign that carries a meaning. A company that declares itself important and does not have a website, or has an amateur website, expresses an incongruent image of itself.

"Intercultural Negotiation" by Daniele Trevisani

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

__________

For further information see:

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

__________

In the next two articles we are going to deal with non-verbal communication and its characteristics: in fact, the non-verbal language can deeply affect the result of an intercultural negotiation both positively and negatively, even though it is often a neglected aspect of communication.

The main channels through which the negotiator can send messages are the paralinguistic system (vocal aspects of communication, such as tones, accents, silences, interjections), the body language (body language), and personal accessories, including clothing and the general look.

To negotiate at an intercultural level, it is necessary to create a relationship. Body movements and attitudes can strongly express the interlocutor’s satisfaction, as well as his/her disgust and emotional suffering.

We perceive the interlocutor’s attitude through his/her behaviour, rather than through the linguistic content, which remains on the relationship surface. In depth, one’s relationship is determined by body and face movements, looks, facial expressions, and, generally, by the communicator’s complete non-verbal repertoire.

The intercultural negotiator, however, must always consider the fact that some non-verbal signals cane be perceived differently by another culture, sometimes even in an opposite way.

Wrong non-verbal and body attitudes can easily lead to an escalation (rise in tension, nervousness and irritation), while the task of an intercultural negotiator is to create a de-escalation: moderation of tones, relaxed atmosphere, favourable environment for negotiation.

The general objective of every intercultural negotiation is, in fact, achieving results, but, in order to do so, a climate of cooperation is needed.

The intercultural negotiator must therefore activate some conflict de-escalation procedures, practices that lead to a non-conflictual negotiation situation.

But what are these practices? In general, each culture uses different non-verbal rules, and therefore we would need for each nation or culture with which we deal.

The problem with these “easy manuals” is their poor resistance over time (cultures evolve) and in space (cultures change even within a few kilometres). Moreover, if you take them as rules, there is a real possibility to apply stereotypes, that are no longer valid.

When there is no specific indication that come from up-to-date experts of a particular culture, we can use some general rules of good communication, which can help us reduce errors, as exposed by the Public Policy Centre of the University of Nebraska:

  • use a calm, non-aggressive tone of voice;
  • smile, express acceptance;
  • use facial expression of interest;
  • use open gestures;
  • allow the person you are talking to dictate the spatial distances (spatial distances vary widely between cultures);
  • nod, give nods of agreement;
  • focus on people and not on documents;
  • bend your body forward as a sign of interest;
  • maintain a relaxed attitude;
  • hold an L-shaped position;
  • sit by your interlocutor’s side, not in front of him/her, because that is a confrontational position.

I would like to highlight that these general rules are only “possible options” and must be adapted to culture and context.

While talking about the non-verbal language it is impossible not to mention the body language. Our body speaks, expresses emotions and feelings.

The body language concerns:

  • facial expressions;
  • nods;
  • limbs movements and gestures;
  • body movements and social distance;
  • physical contact.

Cultural differences related to this area of communication can be deep. There are no golden rules teaching us what’s best: each choice is strategic and linked to the context (“contextual appropriateness“).

Physical contact, for example, is one of the most critical elements: while some Western standards of physical contact spread throughout the entire business community (e.g. shaking hands), every culture expresses a different degree of contact during greetings and interactions.

In general, if it is not possible to collect accurate information from experts of the local culture, it is advisable to limit physical contact in order not to generate a sense of invasiveness.

The study “of observations and theories concerning the use of human space, seen as a specific elaboration of culture” (Hall, 1988) is defined by proxemics.

On the negotiation front, the implications are numerous, since every culture has unwritten rules to define the boundaries of acceptability of interpersonal distances. In this case too, resorting to experts of the local culture is fundamental. If we do not have this possibility, then a valid rule is to let the other party define their own degree of distance, without forcing either an approach or a removal.

Human critical distances have an animal basis and a strong cultural variance: for example, Arab and Latin cultures are often “closer”, while Anglo-Saxon cultures are more “distant”.

Another element of non-verbal language, that we must consider, is the paralinguistic system. Paralinguistics concerns all vocal emissions that are not strictly related to “words”, and includes:

  • tone of the voice;
  • volume;
  • silences;
  • pauses;
  • rhythm of speech;
  • interjections (short vocal emissions, like “er”, “uhm”, etc.).

Paralinguistics establishes speech punctuation and helps convey emotional information.

To be continued…

"Intercultural Negotiation" by Daniele Trevisani

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

__________

For further information see:

Articolo estratto dal testo “Parliamoci Chiaro: il modello delle quattro distanze per una comunicazione efficace e costruttiva” copyright Gribaudo Editore e Daniele Trevisani, pubblicato con il permesso dell’autore.

__________

Continuiamo a parlare di comunicazione non verbale trattando questa volta il concetto di paralinguistica, passando poi al training non verbale e infine al tema della consonanza e dissonanza tra stili linguistici e non verbali, che può portare nel primo caso ad una comunicazione efficace, e nel secondo caso ad un possibile fallimento comunicativo.

La paralinguistica

La paralinguistica riguarda tutte le emissioni vocali che non siano riconducibili strettamente a “parole”, e comprende: 

  • il tono della voce; 
  • il volume; 
  • i silenzi; 
  • le pause; 
  • il ritmo del parlato; 
  • le interiezioni (brevi emissioni, come “ehm”, “uhm”…). 

Essa stabilisce la punteggiatura del parlato e contribuisce a trasmettere le informazioni emotive. Messaggi quali “sono teso”, “sono arrabbiato” o “sono ben disposto” trasudano più dal sistema paralinguistico (percepibile dal suono, a livello uditivo) che dal sistema linguistico (parole e frasi).  

Una frase può portare con sé significati completamente diversi in base all’enfasi posta su parole e al tono di voce. 

Training non verbale

L’addestramento all’uso del paralinguistico richiede un training sull’uso strategico delle pause e dei toni. In generale, la formazione per il non verbale prevede l’accesso a tutti i repertori delle tecniche teatrali e dell’attore: il metodo Stanislavskij e altri metodi di formazione teatrale sono gli unici veramente in grado di agire in profondità sulla formazione e sulla trasformazione dei comportamenti espressivi degli adulti. 

Un training adeguato può essere utile per addestrare il comunicatore a cogliere il tremore della voce altrui (sintomo di nervosismo e stress) e le reazioni non verbali alle proprie affermazioni, e ad agire “teatralmente” tramite movimento, pause e alternanze di ritmi per dare enfasi a parti del discorso e ai punti chiave da fare emergere. 

Come per ogni altro compito manageriale, senza un’adeguata preparazione le chances di essere competitivi sul piano comunicativo calano quando gli equilibri di competenze sono sbilanciati. All’aumentare del divario tra il nostro training e il grado di training della controparte aumentano i rischi di esito sfavorevole di ogni comunicazione. 

Consonanza e dissonanza tra stili linguistici e non verbali

La comunicazione non verbale può rinforzare il messaggio verbale o essere dissonante rispetto a questo. Parlarsi chiaro vuol dire anche cercare coerenza tra i messaggi verbali che emettiamo e la nostra comunicazione non verbale. Se dico un no vero, lo posso accompagnare da un gesto corporeo che segnala il diniego. Se dico un , lo posso accompagnare anche con il body language, con un gesto di apertura delle braccia e un cenno del capo, che mostri che il mio è sentito. 

Quando il corpo dice altro rispetto alla voce, siamo in presenza di incongruenze comunicative o dissonanze comunicative. 

Ascoltare attentamente e dare cenni di assenso può segnalare interesse molto più di una semplice dichiarazione verbale. Dire “sono interessato” con le parole ed esprimere noia o disgusto con le azioni del corpo produce un segnale dissonante e crea sospetto o irritazione. 

I segnali non verbali possono indicare che l’interlocutore stia seguendo con atteggiamento positivo o negativo il dialogo. Le reazioni negative in generale sono denotate da: 

  • angolazioni del corpo (spalle ritratte, allontanamento); 
  • volto (teso, dimostra rabbia); 
  • voce (tono negativo, silenzi improvvisi); 
  • mani (movimenti di rifiuto o disapprovazione, movimenti tesi); 
  • braccia (tese, incrociate sul petto); 
  • gambe (incrociate o che si allontanano nell’angolazione). 

Per riassumere, ogni stile linguistico (a livello interpersonale) si associa ad una precisa modulazione dello stile non verbale. Possiamo infatti avere: 

  • situazioni di rinforzo comunicativo (lo stile non verbale rafforza lo stile verbale); 
  • situazioni di dissonanza o incongruenza tra verbale e non-verbale (la comunicazione non verbale procede su un registro diverso rispetto a quella verbale). 

Le dissonanze riguardano ogni sistema semiotico, ogni segno portatore di possibili significati. Per esempio, un’azienda che si dichiari importante e non abbia un sito internet, o abbia un sito amatoriale, esprime una dissonanza d’immagine.

Concludendo, la coerenza (matching) tra parole e azioni, tra comunicazione verbale e non verbale: 

  • aumenta l’onestà percepita del soggetto; 
  • denota e crea fiducia (trustworthiness); 
  • dimostra interessamento; 
  • mostra che siamo in controllo della situazione; 
  • produce senso di sicurezza e solidità dei contenuti. 

Al contrario, l’incongruenza tra i canali comunicativi verbali e non verbali: 

  • crea senso di sfiducia; 
  • genera sensazioni di scarsa autenticità; 
  • produce dubbi e sospetti di falsità sui contenuti verbali ascoltati; 
  • genera effetti negativi sul personal branding e sull’immagine personale. 
libro "Parliamoci Chiaro" di Daniele Trevisani

Per approfondimenti vedi:

Articolo estratto dal testo “Parliamoci Chiaro: il modello delle quattro distanze per una comunicazione efficace e costruttiva” copyright Gribaudo Editore e Daniele Trevisani, pubblicato con il permesso dell’autore.

__________

Restiamo nell’ambito della seconda distanza, introducendo il linguaggio non verbale e le sue differenze culturali.

Il codice comunicativo umano comprende il movimento corporeo e persino le stesse caratteristiche corporee osservabili, che assumono funzione di elemento comunicativo, come un tatuaggio, il grado di cura della pelle, o dei capelli, il look fisico e gli accessori e abbigliamento. 

Il corpo parla, esprime significati, emozioni e sentimenti. Anche i tentativi di bloccare queste emozioni e sentimenti sono essi stessi “metamessaggi”: vedere una persona che non esprime alcuna emozione, o si sforza di reprimerle è di per sé un segnale che porta a specifiche riflessioni. 

Body language

Il body language riguarda: 

  • la mimica facciale e le espressioni facciali; 
  • i cenni del capo; 
  • i movimenti degli arti e la gestualità; 
  • i movimenti del corpo e le distanze; 
  • il tatto e il contatto fisico.

Le differenze culturali su questi punti possono essere molto ampie.  Pe questo motivo la distanza di Codice (D2) è spesso maggiore di quanto si supponga.

Le culture variano molto sul tipo di gestualità. Per esempio in una comunicazione italo-cinese si possono notare evidenti differenze tra la gestualità italiana e le sue tipiche espressioni facciali, mediamente più ampie ed evidenti, e quelle cinesi, più contenute.

Il contatto fisico

Oltre ai movimenti del corpo e del viso, un altro elemento molto importante della comunicazione non verbale è il contatto fisico. L’intimità del contatto fisico è in genere preclusa a molte culture e relegata a contesti molto limitati quali la stretta di mano, e va usato con attenzione. 

Mentre alcuni standard occidentali di contatto fisico si diffondono nell’intera comunità di business, come la stretta di mano, ma ogni cultura esprime un diverso grado di contatto nei saluti e nelle interazioni fisiche.  In generale, qualora non sia possibile raccogliere informazioni accurate da esperti della cultura locale, è preferibile limitare il contatto fisico per non generare un senso di invasività. 

In generale, la D2 parla anche del grado di intimità che due persone possono avere tra di loro. Il nostro modo di comunicare, dalla parola al tocco sino a interi brani di non verbale hanno a che fare con la distanza emotiva e persino con la distanza o vicinanza spirituale delle persone. Esiste quindi quella che possiamo chiamare una “prossemica emozionale” (studio delle distanze di valori sul piano emotivo) e una “prossemica spirituale” (studio delle distanze di valori sul piano spirituale).  

Gli intenti di chi comunica sono altrettanto forti, e collegano la D2 (codici comunicativi) alla D1 (ruolo che voglio giocare nella relazione). Esiste un driver, una pulsione in ognuno di noi: il desiderio di avere una comunicazione autentica e di comprenderci reciprocamente. Ma, anche se c’è la volontà di comprendersi, bisogna fare i conti con il problema tecnico del comunicare, ed essere consapevoli che non sempre c’è la possibilità di comprendersi davvero a fondo.

L’uso dello spazio nella comunicazione

Ogni cultura ha regole non scritte per delimitare i confini di accettabilità delle distanze interpersonali e delle disposizioni delle persone. 

Anche in questo caso, vale il principio di ricorrere alla conoscenza di esperti della cultura locale, mentre una regola valida in caso di mancata conoscenza è quella di lasciare che sia la controparte a definire il proprio grado di distanza, senza forzare né un avvicinamento né un allontanamento. 

La consapevolezza principale da sviluppare è quella della “distanza critica”, che definisce la distanza interpersonale entro la quale un soggetto si sente vulnerabile, esposto ai rischi di un’aggressione.  La distanza personale viene infatti definita da Hall come “una bolla invisibile che circonda l’organismo”.

Al di là delle regole intra-culturali, alcuni atteggiamenti relativi alle distanze sono trasversali alle culture perché ancorati alla radice animale umana. Per esempio “lasciare il posto”, dare spazio a qualcuno, è uno strumento per assegnare status, riconoscere l’importanza dell’interlocutore, e comunicare rispetto.   

Per il comunicatore consapevole, non è da intendere come pura sottomissione, ma può assumere anche la funzione di mossa tattica, atto di cortesia relazionale che precede il confronto negoziale vero e proprio. Far stare scomodi, al contrario, serve per stabilire forti distanze.  

Alcuni comunicatori usano tattiche specificamente volte a turbare l’equilibrio emotivo del soggetto (logoramento emotivo). In questo modo si crea dissonanza interna, e quando si è in dissonanza interna, si è più deboli nella comunicazione e la comunicazione personale si fa più scomposta.  

La tattica adeguata è quella di esigere un grado di comfort superiore, ma solo se si ha la quasi matematica certezza che una specifica mossa di avversità sia in corso, e quelle non siano le reali condizioni massime di accoglienza che il soggetto è in grado di offrire. 

libro "Parliamoci Chiaro" di Daniele Trevisani

Per approfondimenti vedi:

Articolo estratto dal testo “Parliamoci Chiaro: il modello delle quattro distanze per una comunicazione efficace e costruttiva” copyright Gribaudo Editore e Daniele Trevisani, pubblicato con il permesso dell’autore.

__________

Conclusi gli articoli sulla prima distanza e sull’Analisi Transazionale, ci spostiamo a parlare della seconda distanza, quella dei codici comunicativi, di cui seguirà una breve introduzione.

Noi umani comunichiamo con codici linguistici, paralinguistici e non verbali, utilizzando sia una “lingua” (italiano, francese, tedesco) che uno stile o sottocodice di quella lingua (ottimista, pessimista, burocratese, ironico, ecc.) 

Un aspetto fondamentale della conversazione è la comunicazione non verbale: il linguaggio del corpo può esprimere una grande varietà di significati, che “trasudano” e irrompono nella comunicazione anche senza il controllo diretto dei soggetti. 

Altrettanto importante è il sistema paralinguistico, fatto di toni, accenti, enfasi su parole o parti del discorso, silenzi, e tutto quanto riferisce al “non verbale del parlato”. 

Per riassumere, i canali principali attraverso i quali il comunicatore può lanciare messaggi sono composti dal sistema paralinguistico, dal body language e dagli accessori personali, inclusi l’abbigliamento e il look generale. 

Parlarsi chiaro richiede un linguaggio corporeo che accompagni il testo verbale, senza dare però per scontato che le persone con cui interagiamo abbiano studiato la comunicazione non verbale. Per comprendersi infatti è necessario esprimersi apertamente, mentre per dare vita ad una comunicazione costruttiva è fondamentale creare rapporto.

L’atteggiamento percepito nell’altro dipende in larga misura dal “come” viene espresso il comportamento, piuttosto che dal contenuto linguistico, il quale rimane alla superficie del rapporto stesso. In profondità, il rapporto è determinato dagli atteggiamenti del corpo e da tutto il repertorio non verbale del comunicatore, il quale deve sempre considerare la possibilità che alcuni segnali di atteggiamento utilizzati nella propria cultura siano colti in modo anche diametralmente opposto in una cultura diversa e che il suo stile non sia capito, che sia frainteso, o che proprio non piaccia. 

Atteggiamenti non verbali e corporei sbagliati possono portare facilmente ad una escalation (salita di tensione, nervosismo e irritazione), mentre il compito del comunicatore efficace è quello di creare de-escalation: moderazione dei toni, clima rilassato, ambiente favorevole alla comunicazione.  

L’obiettivo generale della comunicazione infatti è di essere efficaci e raggiungere risultati, il che prevede generalmente un clima di cooperazione.   

Come già accennato, ogni cultura usa regole non verbali diverse, ma in assenza di precise indicazioni che provengano da conoscitori aggiornati della cultura stessa, possiamo utilizzare come base di partenza alcune regole generali di buona comunicazione per ridurre il potenziale di errore, come esposto dal Public Policy Center della University of Nebraska: 

  • tono di voce pacato, non aggressivo; 
  • sorriso, per esprimere accettazione dell’altro; 
  • espressione facciale di interesse; 
  • gesti aperti; 
  • permettere alla persona con cui si sta parlando di dettare le distanze spaziali tra di voi (le distanze spaziali variano ampiamente da cultura a cultura); 
  • annuire, dare cenni di assenso; 
  • focalizzarsi sulle persone e non sui documenti presenti sul tavolo; 
  • piegare il corpo in avanti in segno di interesse; 
  • mantenere una condizione di relax; 
  • tenere una posizione a L, disporsi non di fronte (posizione confrontazionale), ma su due lati vicini del tavolo. 

Teniamo a sottolineare che queste indicazioni di massima sono solo “possibili opzioni” e devono essere di volta in volta adattate alla cultura di riferimento. 

libro "Parliamoci Chiaro" di Daniele Trevisani

Per approfondimenti vedi:

Copyright. Estratto dal libro

Strategic selling. Psicologia e comunicazione per la vendita consulenziale e le negoziazioni complesse

Con commenti e note inedite dell’autore

Tecniche non-verbali di ascolto attivo

Utilizzano l’atteggiamento del corpo per esprimere interesse:

 

  • postura, aperta ed inclinata in avanti per indicare disponibilità; posizione del corpo rilassata e di disponibilità;
  • avvicinamento e allontanamento (prossemica): ridurre la distanza con l’interlocutore nei momenti di maggiore interesse, allontanarsi nei momenti di distensione;
  • espressione del volto: non dubitativa, ironica o aggressiva, ma attenta e partecipativa;
  • sguardo attento e diretto;
  • movimenti delle sopracciglia associati a punti salienti del discorso altrui;
  • cenni del capo, cenni assenso o di diniego;
  • gesti morbidi, lenti e rotatori per comunicare senso di rilassamento e incoraggiare ad andare avanti nella conversazione;
  • metafore non verbali utilizzando il body language, che dimostrano comprensione di quanto detto dalla controparte.

 

Sul piano non verbale, dobbiamo sempre considerare che numerose culture frenano l’espressione non verbale delle emozioni (es.: quelle asiatiche), ma che anche questo dato è uno stereotipo comunicativo, di valenza solo probabilistica e non consegna certezze.

In sintesi, le tecniche principali per un accolto efficace sono:

  • curiosità e interesse;
  • parafrasi: ripetere con le proprie parole quanto capito (questo non equivale ad essere d’accordo con quanto detto dall’altro);
  • sintesi e riassunti: riformulare la “storia” nei suoi punti salienti, per consolidare quanto raccolto;
  • dirigere l’ascolto tramite domande mirate (ricentraggio conversazio­nale) per far luce sui punti ancora oscuri o i passaggi ancora non ben chiari;
  • evitare domande eccessivamente personali finché non si sia creato un rapporto solido e “caldo”;
  • offrire al parlante la possibilità di dare feedback sul fatto che quanto capito sia corretto, accurato o invece distorto o lacunoso;
  • ascoltare non solo le parole ma anche i segnali non verbali per valutare sentimenti e stati d’animo;
  • verificare la corretta comprensione sia dei sentimenti che del contenuto, non ignorare l’aspetto dei sentimenti;
  • non dire alle persone come dovrebbero sentirsi o ciò che dovrebbero pensare (nella fase di ascolto, limitarsi a trarre informazioni, senza voler insegnare o valutare).

 

Ancora una volta, sottolineiamo che questi atteggiamenti sono preziosi e determinano la qualità della fase di ascolto, ma non vanno confusi con gli obiettivi di tutta la negoziazione (che prevede sia fasi di ascolto che fasi propositive e affermazioni anche dure o assertive).

In una negoziazione è possibile (ed è anzi uno degli obiettivi strategici) modificare ciò che gli altri pensano (ristrutturazione cognitiva e persuasiva) o come gli altri si sentono (azione emozionale), ma questo obiettivo verrà perseguito solo ed unicamente se prima il negoziatore sia riuscito a porre in essere un ascolto attivo, attivando l’empatia necessaria per capire in quale quadro si stia muovendo.

Copyright

Strategic selling. Psicologia e comunicazione per la vendita consulenziale e le negoziazioni complesse

Con commenti e note inedite dell’autore

Comunicazione non verbale – gli aspetti intra-culturali e interculturali

Copyright, estratto dal testo

Negoziazione interculturale. Comunicare oltre le barriere culturali, di Daniele Trevisani, Franco Angeli editore

Un aspetto fondamentale della negoziazione, spesso trascurato, è la comunicazione non verbale che avviene tra i partecipanti. Il linguaggio del corpo può esprimere una grande varietà di significati, che “trasudano” e irrompono nella negoziazione anche senza il controllo diretto dei soggetti.

Il negoziatore attento a misurare le parole può essere poco consapevole del livello non verbale, e dello scambio “sotterraneo” di messaggi che il corpo e le espressioni facciali lasciano filtrare.

I canali principali attraverso i quali il negoziatore può lanciare messaggi sono composti dal sistema paralinguistico (aspetti vocali della comunicazione, escluso l’aspetto linguistico, come i toni, gli accenti, i silenzi, le interiezioni), dal body language (il linguaggio del corpo), e dagli accessori personali, incluso l’abbigliamento e il look generale.

Gli atteggiamenti creano il rapporto

Per negoziare a livello interculturale o creare rapporti efficaci, è necessario creare rapporto, e gli atteggiamenti corporali sono in grado di esprimere con forza il gradimento per l’interlocutore, così come il disgusto e la sofferenza emotiva.

disgusto

L’atteggiamento percepito nell’altro dipende in larga misura dal “come” viene espresso il comportamento, piuttosto che dal contenuto linguistico, il quale rimane alla superficie del rapporto stesso. In profondità, il rapporto è determinato dagli atteggiamenti del corpo e del volto, dagli sguardi, dalle espressioni facciali, e più in generale da tutto il repertorio non verbale del comunicatore.

Ad esempio, è stato notato come sia più facile dare del “tu” a qualcuno che porta una cravatta slacciata, piuttosto che una cravatta rigorosamente allacciata.

Evidentemente il fatto di essere “morbidi” o non rigorosi nell’abbigliamento crea una sensazione di minore rigidità e maggiore tolleranza verso comportamenti amicali. Con questo non si vuol dire di portare una cravatta allacciata o slacciata, ma semplicemente confermare che gli atteggiamenti incidono sul rapporto, e che tra gli atteggiamenti vi sono anche dettagli apparenti quale il grado di allacciatura di una cravatta, o la rigorosità dell’abbigliamento.

Ma, allo stesso tempo, si può notare che una cravatta slacciata sia accettabile nel management italiano (segno di atteggiamento rilassato) o nel management americano (segno di atteggiamento “busy”, di chi lavora sodo), mentre sia molto meno accettabile nel management tedesco, o nelle aziende ad alto grado di formalizzazione delle gerarchie. Pertanto, il negoziatore interculturale deve sempre considerare la possibilità che alcuni segnali di atteggiamento utilizzati nella propria cultura siano colti in modo anche diametralmente opposto in una cultura diversa.

In assenza di precise indicazioni che provengano da conoscitori aggiornati della cultura stessa, possiamo utilizzare come base di partenza alcune regole generali di buona comunicazione per ridurre il potenziale di errore, come esposto dal Public Policy Center della University of Nebraska[1]:

  • tono di voce pacato, non aggressivo;
  • sorriso, esprimere accettazione dell’altro;
  • espressione facciale di interesse;
  • gesti aperti;
  • permettere alla persona con cui si sta parlando di dettare le distanze spaziali tra di voi (le distanze spaziali variano ampiamente da cultura a cultura);
  • annuire, dare cenni di assenso;
  • focalizzarsi sulle persone e non sui documenti presenti sul tavolo;
  • piegare il corpo in avanti in segno di interesse;
  • mantenere una condizione di relax;
  • tenere una posizione a l, disporsi non di fronte (posizione confrontazionale), ma su due lati vicini del tavolo.

Teniamo a sottolineare che queste indicazioni di massima sono solo “possibili opzioni” e devono essere di volta in volta adattate alla cultura di riferimento.

Body language

Il corpo parla, esprime emozioni e sentimenti. Anche i tentativi di bloccare queste emozioni e sentimenti sono essi stessi “metamessaggi”, vedere una persona che non esprime alcuna emozioni, il quale agisce come “mummia emotiva”, è di per se un segnale che porta a specifiche riflessioni.

Il body language riguarda:

  • la mimica facciale e le espressioni facciali;
  • i cenni del capo;
  • i movimenti degli arti e la gestualità;
  • i movimenti del corpo e le distanze;
  • il tatto e il contatto fisico.

Le differenze culturali su questi punti possono essere molto ampie. Le culture variano molto sul tipo di gestualità. In una negoziazione italo-cinese si possono notare evidenti differenze tra la gestualità italiana (mediamente più ampia) e quella cinese, più contenuta, così come nelle espressioni facciali, più evidenti per l’Italia e più contenute per la Cina.

Un negoziatore che operi in Cina potrà quindi scegliere di contenere la propria gestualità e la propria espressione emotiva, per “smorzare” l’immagine stereotipica associata alla propria cultura, o anzi aumentarla teatralmente, per “giocare una parte” e amplificare la propria identità stereotipica. Su cosa sia meglio fare non esistono regole auree, ogni scelta è strategica e legata al contesto del momento, alle “appropriatezze contestuali”.

Il contatto fisico è uno degli elementi più critici e difficili da trattare sul piano interculturale.

Mentre alcuni standard occidentali di contatto fisico si diffondono nell’intera comunità di business (es: il dare la mano), ogni cultura esprime un diverso grado di contatto nel saluti e nelle interazioni.

Gestire abbracci, baci, toccare il corpo, sapere chi può toccare chi, rimane un punto difficile, da risolvere soprattutto ricorrendo ad una analisi della cultura locale. In generale, qualora non sia possibile raccogliere informazioni accurate da esperti della cultura locale, è suggeribile limitare il contatto fisico per non generare senso di invasività.

[1] Nebraska Disaster Behavioral Health, University of Nebraska, Public Policy Center.

____

Copyright, estratto dal testo

Negoziazione interculturale. Comunicare oltre le barriere culturali, di Daniele Trevisani, Franco Angeli editore